Last edited by Duk
Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

3 edition of John Ericsson and the age of caloric. found in the catalog.

John Ericsson and the age of caloric.

Eugene S. Ferguson

John Ericsson and the age of caloric.

by Eugene S. Ferguson

  • 93 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Smithsonian Institution in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ericsson, John, 1803-1889,
  • Caloric engines,
  • Marine engines

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesU. S. National Museum. Bulletin 228, Contributions from the Museum of History and Technology, Paper 20, Bulletin (United States National Museum) ;, 228.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQ11 .U6 no. 228
    The Physical Object
    Pagination42-59 p.
    Number of Pages59
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5840739M
    LC Control Number61060968
    OCLC/WorldCa1968607

    Focusing on the man behind the inventions, this book tells the life story of John Ericsson. It details a number of Ericsson’s inventions including a steam-powered fire engine, the first screw-propelled warship, a variety of “hot-air engines,” and early experiments in solar power from the roof of his Manhattan home.   john ericsson and the engines of exile Leaving behind financial ruin in their ancestral Swedish village, in the Ericsson family brought their small children across the country, entering a dynamic project to link Sweden’s two boundary seas with a warship canal.5/5(3).

    John Ericsson (J – March 8, ) was an American Swedish-born inventor and mechanical engineer, as was his brother, Nils Ericson. He was born at Långbanshyttan in Värmland, Sweden, but primarily came to be active in the United States. The son of a mining engineer, Ericsson showed an early interest in mechanics. By the age of ten, he had designed and constructed a miniature sawmill and by 13, he was a cadet in the Swedish navy. From the description of John Ericsson letter on caloric engines, January (The Mariners' Museum Library). Ericsson, John,

    John Ericsson. Remembered in America as the inventor of the ironclad USS Monitor, Ericsson was born in Langbanshytten, Sweden on J While serving in the Swedish military, at the young age of twenty-three, Ericsson developed a "caloric" hot-air engine that won him international fame in . John Ericsson (), Swedish-born American engineer and inventor, perfected the screw propeller and constructed radically designed warships, notably the ironclad "Monitor." John Ericsson was born in Långbanshyttan, Värmland Province, on J He began as an iron miner but showed an aptitude for machinery construction, drafting, and.


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John Ericsson and the age of caloric by Eugene S. Ferguson Download PDF EPUB FB2

John Ericsson and the age of caloric. Washington, Smithsonian Institution, (OCoLC) Named Person: John Ericsson; John Ericsson: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Eugene S Ferguson. John Ericsson () was born in Sweden and began working independently as a surveyor at the age of fourteen.

He joined the Swedish army in In his spare time, he constructed a heat engine that used fumes instead of steam as a propellant. Abstract. Bound with no. 29 subsequent to graphical of access: InternetAuthor: Eugene S. Ferguson.

able adopted American appear applied attention authority battery British build built called caloric canal Captain Captain Ericsson carried claim complete concerning confidence construction contract dated Department designed direction drawing early engine England Ericsson experience fact feet fire five followed force four give given Government guns hand heat hour hundred idea important improvement inches interest invention iron iron-clad John.

John Ericsson and the age of caloric by Eugene S Ferguson (Book) Annals of the Swedes on the Delaware by Jehu Curtis Clay (Book).

Focusing on the man behind the inventions, this book tells the life story of John Ericsson. It details a number of Ericsson's inventions including a steam-powered fire engine, the first screw-propelled warship, a variety of "hot-air engines," and early experiments in solar power from the roof of his Manhattan home.4/5(1).

(A Lecture on the Late Improvements in Steam Navigation and the Arts of Naval Warfare, with a brief Notice of Ericsson's Caloric Engine, delivered before the Boston Lyceum, by John O.

Sargent. New York, ). The caloric engine of was a sore puzzle to the savans of that day. Ericsson's interest in the hot air engine appears to date from the early eighteen-twenties when in Sweden he constructed a flame engine, as he called it, of several horsepower.

This machine he described in a paper written in Swedish entitled, "A description of a New Method of Employing the Combustion of Fuel as a Moving Power." Ericsson took a model of his engine to London in the hope. John Ericsson, (born JLångbanshyttan, Swed.—died March 8,New York, N.Y., U.S.), Swedish-born American naval engineer and inventor who built the first armoured turret warship and developed the screw propeller.

After serving in the Swedish army as a topographical surveyor, Ericsson went to London in and constructed a steam locomotive, the Novelty, for a railway.

John Ericsson and the Age of Caloric Eugene S Ferguson Washington. John Ericsson. Mannen och uppfinnaren Carola Goldkuht Stockholm. U.S.S Monitor. The Ship That Launched A Modern Navy Edward M Miller Annapolis, ISBN ; The following books are non technical biographies.

John Ericsson. inventor of the screw propellor and warship designer. John Ericsson was born in Langban, Sweden, on J His family moved to Västergötland, where his father was employed as an engineer on construction of the Göta Canal, about The Caloric brand was introduced in It was reorganized in as the Caloric Stove Company in Topton, Pennsylvania.

The company was renamed Caloric Appliance Corp. in and became famous for offering a complete package of kitchen appliances in the s and s. Its most popular product was their built-in wall g: John Ericsson.

2 DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY Repository: The Mariners' Museum Library Title: John Ericsson Letter on Caloric Engines Inclusive Dates: January 25 Catalog number: MS Physical Characteristics: 1 letter (correspondence) Language: English Creator: Ericsson, John, BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH John Ericsson was born in the province of Vermland, Sweden, on J versy over the regenerator and for Ericsson's gigantic caloric engine, see Eugene S.

Ferguson, "John Ericsson and the Age of Caloric," Contribu-tions of the Museum of History and Technology (Washington, ), Paper LYNWOOD BRYANT* * PROFESSOR BRYANT, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has written studies on the early history of.

Eugene S. Ferguson, "John Ericsson and the Age of Caloric." The other four pre-senters were John B. Rae and E. Neal Hartley (who were in the same session as Ferguson, which was chaired by Carl W. Condit and focused on "History of Technology in Amer-ica"), and Lynn White Jr. and Robert I.

Crane (in a session on 29 December titled "Tech. John Ericsson (J – March 8, ) was a Swedish-born inventor and mechanical engineer, as was his brother, Nils Ericsson. See also John Ericsson: Steam Boat 'Novelty', Leading article on John Ericsson, and Caloric Ship 'Ericsson'.

Born at Långbanshyttan in Värmland, Sweden, but primarily came to be active in the United States after spending 13 years in England. In Ericsson unveiled another stunning new design, a “caloric” engine that ran on hot air rather than steam.

In the New York Tribune, Horace Greeley, always ready to cheer the new, wrote that “the age of steam is closed, the age of caloric opens. Fulton and Watt belong to the past. John Ericsson () was born in Sweden and began working independently as a surveyor at the age of fourteen.

He joined the Swedish army in He joined the Swedish army in In his spare time, he constructed a heat engine that used fumes instead of steam as a propellant.

John Ericsson. Built the ironclad USS Monitor. Birthplace: Langbanshyttan, Wermland, Sweden Location of death: New York City Cause of death: unspecified Remains: Buried, Östra. Military service: Swedish Army () Swedish-American naval engineer, born at Langbanshyttan, Wermland, Sweden, on the 31st of July He was the second son of Olaf Born: “Captain John Ericsson: Father of the Monitor,” by Constance Buel Burnett, Vanguard Press, NY, This page hardback is a juvenile biography of the inventor of the Monitor, the ironclad Union ship that defeated the Merrimac, the South’s ironclad, during the Civil War.3/5(1).

Published in by Silver Burdett Press pages of text. 8 pages of timelines, sources and an index at the end. This book is part of a larger series (The History of the Civil War Series).It is very readable with a good balance of national history versus the biography of Swedish immigrant inventor John Ericsson, with the glaring exception I note below.3/5.Ericsson made many other contributions to engineering, notably in ordnance, in marine engines, and in caloric or heat engines.

In his late years he did experimental work in solar physics. Bibliography. See biography by R. White (). Ericsson, John (–89) Born:   John Ericsson and the age of caloric by Eugene S.

Ferguson 2 editions - first published in Written works: Engineering and the Mind's Eye.